Monday, November 14, 2005

The Flow of Snobbery


Okay, so remember I posted about that NPR show, The Business, and its unnecessarily snide tone?

Well, it turns out the show's host also has a blog. Someone tipped me to it, and it only took one post for me to get irritated. I give you Exhibit A: this item about the Weinstein Company developing a movie based on a Marvel Comic, Deathlok.

The guy adds, parenthetically:

"(What? You say you honestly don't know who or what a Deathlok is? And you claim to live in Los Angeles? For shame!)"

Well, I mean, come on.

You could say the same thing about almost any movie. "You say you don't know who or what a Zathura is?" "You say you don't know who or what a Jarhead is?" "You say you don't know who or what a Syriana is? You say you don't know who or where North Country is?"

It's just an overly facile cheap shot, a waste of time. It's assholic.

Besides, why is it considered "funny" and "snarky" for media types to get all snobby about the fact that they've never heard of stuff that's actually cooler than they are? Given a choice, wouldn't you hide that fact? I would!

Hey, I'd never heard of Deathlok, either. Now that I have, it sounds good, and I'm envious of people who were in the know, not superior to them.

Besides, have you ever noticed snobbery never flows the other way? No one ever writes, "There's a movie opening called Pride and Prejudice, whatever the fuck that is, a book or something." (And by the way, I'm sure the movie is great, but is it my imagination, or is there a movie based on Pride and Prejudice made, like, every two months?)

Like, when Adaptation came out, you could not find one single critic who wrote, "I never heard of Whosits Orleans or The Orchid Whatsis, and is The New Yorker that magazine my dentist has in his waiting room?" Far from it. Every critic claimed to have the book on his nightstand, to have memorized the article, to have dined with the author, blah blah blah...

Yet I actually read a review of The Day After Tomorrow in afforementioned New Yorker wherein the critic referred to the destruction of "a round white building with 'Capitol Records' written on it."

That's just assholic.

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